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Your collar bone, like any other part of your body, should move well. If it doesn’t, it’s function will be affected either locally or further away.

Notice:
That the inner end of your collar bone (“clavicle”) attaches to upper end of your breastbone.  This is the only place your arm attaches to your torso. If your collar bone does not move well it can affect how any part of your shoulder or arm works.

Notice that there is a gap between the collar bone and the first rib. This gap allows blood vessels, lymph vessels and nerves to travel through.  If this lacks space then any of these structures can be compressed . That compression will lead you to move in a way to avoid irritating them. As a consequence, you can cause strain to your neck, shoulder, elbow wrist or hand.

Interesting patterns I’ve been seeing in the clinic

At the right collar bone, lymph flow is returning towards the heart from the upper liver and right lung, head, neck and arm. So here there can be an interplay between lymph congestion in those places and the right neck, shoulder or arm.

Similarly at the left collar bone, lymph flow is returning towards the heart from the left head-neck-arm-lung-abdomen-both legs, and so here there can be an interplay between lymph congestion in those places and the left neck, shoulder or arm.

For a Contented Clavicle

  • You should be able to float your shoulders upwards, forwards, backwards, and downwards.

Some simple stretches

Start all these stretches by interlacing your fingers.

  • Reach forward, pressing your palms way from you.
  • Reach upwards, pressing your palms away from you.
  • Interlace your fingers behind you, or grasp the back of one hand with the other behind your back.
    First, roll your shoulders up and open.
    Then,  straighten your arms +/- lift your hands off your back, keeping your shoulders rolled open.

Basic Posture tip

First, allow your upper body to be light and to float above your hips/lower body.
Then float your shoulders up and open.

Enjoy the stretches.